Traffic Safety Education

Explanation: There are skills involved in walking that students will use their entire lives. If properly encouraged, the same will be true for bicycling. Ensuring that students have the skills and knowledge to safely engage in these common and potentially lifelong activities is crucial. Studies show that students who receive age-appropriate traffic safety education have improved attitudes and knowledge and make safer decisions when crossing streets,[42] and the countries with the lowest numbers of traffic crashes provide traffic safety education during every year of elementary school.[43] There are many types of walking and biking curricula, including short safety skills clinics, bicycle rodeos that teach skills and safety, comprehensive in-class safety training, and “train-the-trainer” models. Curricula are designed to meet different developmental levels of students. The best curricula can also meet state educational standards.

Option 1: District supports the provision of traffic safety education and trainings on active transportation skills to all students and teachers.

Rating: 
1

Option 2: District encourages individual schools to provide traffic safety education and trainings on active transportation skills for all students and teachers.  District recommends that pedestrian skills and safety workshops occur in and bicycle skills and safety workshops occur in grade.

Rating: 
2

Option 3: District requires individual schools to provide traffic safety education and trainings on active transportation skills for all students and teachers. District further requires that pedestrian skills and safety workshops occur in  and bicycle skills and safety workshops occur in grade.

In addition, District shall host a traffic safety education and skills-training workshop at the beginning of each school year. This workshop shall include training and education for teachers and school personnel so they can actively support District’s efforts to deliver traffic safety education and active transportation skills training.

Rating: 
2

Option 4: District requires individual schools to provide a comprehensive mobility education curriculum with a focus on traffic safety education and active transportation skills for students and teachers. The curriculum shall include: pedestrian skills and safety workshops in  grade; bicycle skills and safety workshops in grade; how to use public transit classes in 6th grade; and safe driving skills, with an emphasis on avoiding injury to pedestrians and bicyclists in 10th grade.

In addition, District shall host a traffic safety education and active transportation skills workshop at the beginning of each school year. This workshop shall include training and education for teachers and school personnel so they can actively support District’s efforts to deliver traffic safety education and active transportation skills training.

Rating: 
3

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Each policy is eligible for a given number of stars, depending upon how much the policy contributes to creating a safe and encouraging atmosphere for children to walk and bicycle to school. Some policies are only eligible for one star, others for two stars, and others for three stars. For some policies, selecting a stronger option may provide additional stars.


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